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Posts Tagged ‘fine’

CT: $85K in Fines for Windsor Plant

July 15, 2014 Leave a comment

WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT — Federal safety officials said they found 17 serious safety violations at TLD Ace. Corp., a maker of ground-support equipment for aircraft, and have fined the company $85,000 following an inspection in February.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration said in a statement released Wednesday that they went to the Bloomfield Avenue plant on a snow-removal complaint but expanded the probe after reviewing TLD Ace’s higher-than-average rate of worker injuries and illnesses.

The inspection found that workers were routinely exposed to “potential falls, burns and electric shock due to missing or inadequate safeguards at the company’s manufacturing plant.”Warren Simpson, OSHA’s area director in Hartford, said the amount of lost work days indicated serious problems at the plant.

“What we found were conditions that could seriously injure workers or negatively impact their health,” Simpson said in the statement. “It’s crucial for this company to correct these conditions now and take action to prevent them from happening again.”

OSHA inspectors went to the plant on a complaint that employees were exposed to falls while removing snow from the roof.

Once inside, inspectors found that electrical equipment was not being used properly, and that workers doing electrical testing lacked . Inspectors saw improperly stored flammable materials and noted that there were no sprinklers in a section of the plant where flammable adhesive was applied.

Company officials also failed to retrain an employee who had suffered hearing loss, and had failed to require workers exposed to dangerous noise levels to wear effective ear protection, the OSHA statement said.

TLD Ace has 15 days to comply with the orders, begin negotiations with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before an independent OSHA review panel.

Story Via: www.courant.com

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Arkansas: Railcar Company Faces $61K in Fines from OSHA

March 6, 2014 Leave a comment

Marmaduke, Ark: The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited American Railcar Industries Inc., headquartered in Saint Charles, Mo., for 10 serious safety violations after an employee was electrocuted while performing repair work on a tanker-style railcar July 25 at the company’s work site near Marmaduke.

“Exposing workers to electrocution hazards without proper safeguards and training is inexcusable,” said Carlos Reynolds, the agency’s area director in Little Rock. “It is the employer’s responsibility to create a safe and healthful workplace where preventable hazards don’t cost workers their lives.”

Upon receiving a fatality report from the employer, OSHA‘s Little Rock Area Office initiated an investigation July 26 at the company’s facility on Highway 34 East and found that workers were being exposed to electrical shocks from welding equipment. The violations include failing to provide personal protection for employees conducting cutting and welding operations; properly mark the power supply and control boxes for voltage, current and wattage; use fixed wiring instead of flexible cords and protect the wiring from possible damage; remove defective electrical equipment from service; and inspect and mark web slings. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

American Railcar Industries, which employs about 260 workers at the Marmaduke facility and about 1,500 workers nationwide, designs and manufactures railcars.

Proposed penalties total $61,400. The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director in Little Rock or contest the citations and penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Story Via: thv11.com

Connecticut: OSHA Hands Out $56K in Fines

February 26, 2014 Leave a comment
Chessire, CT: OSHA has cited Artbeats Inc. for alleged repeat and serious safety violations related to lockout/tagout, electrical safety, and combustible dust and has issued $56,430 in proposed fines.

OSHA announced an enforcement case against Cheshire, Conn.-based Artbeats Inc. for alleged repeat and serious safety violations. The company—which manufactures reproductions and prints of paintings—has been cited for $56,430 in proposed fines. The inspection was completed in early December following a worker complaint.

According to the OSHA news release, the inspection found the facility allegedly at fault for similar hazards the company was cited for in June 2010 at its Waterbury facility. The repeat hazards include alleged failure to provide a program to ensure workers are trained to power down and lock out industrial saws before conducting maintenance, failure to provide a chemical hazard communication program and training on the risks and safeguards associated with chemicals and failure to prevent usage of unapproved electrical equipment in areas that generate combustible wood dust.

The company received eight repeat violations for the above conditions. OSHA also issued one serious violations for an inadequately guarded radial arm saw.

Story Via: ohsonline.com

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Ohio: $86K in Fines for Ohio Plant for Safety Violations

February 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Ohio: The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited G&J Pepsi-Cola Bottlers Inc. for seven workplace health and safety violations, carrying proposed penalties of $86,900. OSHA initiated an inspection of the Franklin Furnace plant in July 2013 under its Site-Specific Targeting Program, which targets facilities with higher than average illness and injury rates.

“This company consistently failed to protect its workers and implement basic safety requirements,” said Bill Wilkerson, OSHA’s area director in Cincinnati. “Repeat violations demonstrate a lack of commitment to employee safety and health, and that is unacceptable when employee safety is on the line.”

Two repeat safety violations involve failing to ensure that employees utilize appropriate personal protective  equipment when working with electrical sources and implement lockout/tagout procedures to prevent the unintentional startup of equipment during maintenance and servicing, when employees are most at risk.

A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. The same violations were cited in 2009 at the company’s Hamilton facility.

Five serious safety citations were issued to the company. Two of those violations involved failure to use lockout/tagout procedures. The remaining three included failing to perform hazard assessments related to personal protective equipment, failure to use appropriate protective equipment and failure to perform annual fit testing to ensure employees wore respirators. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

G&J employs more than 1,600 people at 11 locations in Ohio and Kentucky, including production facilities in Lexington and Winchester, Ky., and in Columbus and Portsmouth, Ohio. G&J has distribution centers in Hamilton, Ripley, Hillsboro, Athens, Chillicothe, and Zanesville and in Harrodsburg, Ky. The company has contested the findings before the independent Occupational Safety & Health Review Commission.

Story Via: norwalkreflector.com

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Connecticut: OSHA Fines Bristol Plant $109K in Fines

February 4, 2014 Leave a comment

Bristol, CT: Radcliff Wire Inc., of Bristol, faces $109,000 in fines for repeated workplace hazards, including gaps in worker training, dangerous electrical conditions, and faulty safeguards against burns and eye injuries, federal regulators said Monday morning.

A new round of inspections by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that began last summer found the same kinds of hazards that were revealed at the plant in 2009, said OSHA‘s chief in Hartford, Warren Simpson.

“The sizable fines proposed here reflect the breadth and gravity of these hazards and the fact that this employer has been cited previously for several of these conditions,” Simpson said in a written statement released OSHA’s regional office in Boston.

“Left uncorrected, plant employees are exposed to hazards, such as electric shock, arc flashes, fire, eye and crushing injuries. It’s imperative that employers not just correct hazards, but effectively prevent their recurrence,” Simpson said.

Radcliff Wire, at 97 Ronzo Road, has 15 business days to either begin settlement negotiations with OSHA’s Hartford office, or contest the findings before OSHA’s review panel.

The latest inspection resulted in 15 citations for a range of hazards, including failure to shut power before electricians worked machinery, failure to regularly inspect pipe systems and protective gear, improper storage of flammable chemicals, and failure to provide eye prtoection to employees who were working with corrosive chemicals.

Story Via: Courant.com

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Nevada: MSHA Issues 135 Citations to Mining Company

February 4, 2014 Leave a comment

ELKO, NV — The Mine Safety and Health Administration said Veris Gold failed to protect employees from harm at the company’s Jerritt Canyon Mill, after issuing 61 citations and orders to the site.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s MSHA announced the results of the December inspections Wednesday. The inspectors issued 135 citations, 24 orders and one safeguard during special impact inspections conducted at 11 coal mines and two metal and nonmetal mines.

The two highlighted properties in the inspection report were Jerritt Canyon and Hanover Resources LLC’s Caymus Mine in Boone County, W. Va. Caymus Mine produces coal.

“These two examples clearly indicate that some mine operators still don’t get it,” said Joseph A. Main, assistant secretary of labor for mine safety and health. “They simply failed to comply with the Mine Act and find and fix hazards to protect miners from injury, illness and death.”

Veris Gold said “Jerritt Canyon takes all citations and actions from MSHA seriously and its management has been working with them diligently to review all claims. As of January 16, 2014, all citations and actions have been either acknowledged or met.

“It is important to note that the Jerritt Canyon Operations has an exemplary safety record with no fatalities since it began operating in 1982. Safety is our priority, and we will continue to work with MSHA in order to continue to ensure the safety of all employees.

“Recently, Veris Gold USA initiated a Safety Enhancement Program that is the personal responsibility of Graham Dickson, COO. This program will ensure that all employees remain secure at work and return home safely to their families at the end of the day.”

Jerritt Canyon received 49 citations and 12 orders after its inspection that began on Dec. 16. Veris Gold owns the Jerritt Canyon Mill Complex, which is 50 miles north of Elko and has more than 120 employees. The complex property includes three gold mines: Smith, SSX-Steer and Starvation Canyon.

According to the federal agency, “among the hazardous conditions cited during the inspection, MSHA found that an electrician working in the crusher area had been cleaning and performing maintenance on a 480-volt fully-energized switch gear, and there were spent mercury containers found at the bottom of wet mill stairs rather than being stored in a manner that would protect miners from mercury exposure. Nearly four feet of dirt had accumulated on the left side of a conveyor belt, blocking access to the steps and catwalk used to reach the plant and potentially hindering escape during an emergency.

“Inspectors also found: a chemical container improperly labeled; no warning signs for hazardous chemical storage; several unsecured gas cylinders; no provision for safe access in several locations; missing electrical cover plates on energized outlets; an improperly grounded cable; unlabeled breakers that exposed miners to electrical hazards; a broken ladder and insufficient illumination; failure to conduct workplace exams and air receiver tanks equipped with the wrong size pressure relief valves, creating the potential hazard of an exploding vessel.”

On Dec. 19, while MSHA inspectors were still on site, an electrical explosion and subsequent fire injured two employees in the mill.

The employees were injured after an arc flash and minor fire, said Shaun Heinrichs, chief financial officer for Veris Gold.

“One employee was airlifted with burns and another was taken into Elko with smoke inhalation,” Heinrichs told the Free Press in December. “Our thoughts are with our employees and their families. Safety is our utmost priority.”

Tim Woolever, Nevada Division of Forestry chief for the northern region, responded to the scene to handle the fire. He believed at least one of the men injured was an electrician who was working on a 480-volt panel.

MSHA inspected the Caymus Mine on Dec. 11 and issued 13 violations. The inspection party monitored the mine’s communication system to prevent advance notice of their arrival, and they proceeded to inspect the mine’s two working sections and a large portion of the conveyor belt. MSHA issued seven unwarrantable failure orders and six citations. This was the first impact inspection at this mine.

Since April 2010, MSHA has conducted 700 impact inspections and issued 11,562 citations, 1,076 orders and 49 safeguards.

Story Via ElkoDaily.com

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New York: $147K Settelment for Electrocution Death

January 24, 2014 1 comment

Brooklyn, NY: A  telecommunications company has reached a settlement with OSHA resolving  litigation surrounding the electrocution death of an employee in 2011 in  Brooklyn. Under the agreement, the company will pay a fine of $147,000 and make  changes to its electrical safety training.

OSHA  Regional Administrator Robert Kulick commented, “While no settlement can bring  this worker back to his family, co-workers, and friends, this agreement can help  prevent similar and needless tragedies in the future.”

The  fatality occurred when a field technician came into contact with an energized  power line as he worked from an aerial lift bucket. OSHA determined that field  technicians were not adequately trained, did not wear proper protective gloves,  and did not ground the suspension strand they were installing.

The  settlement was filed with the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission,  which reviews contested cases.

Story Via: safety.blr.com

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