Archive

Posts Tagged ‘injured’

New York: Arc Flash Injury Leads to $88K in Fines

July 24, 2014 Leave a comment

NY – Another thousand-dollar-fine was issued by OSHA for citing violations on electrical safety and hazardous energy control standards. This time to O’Connell Electric Co., particularly on the May 18 Worker Arc Flash Injury. The incident happened at the North Campus of the State University of New York (SUNY) when O’Connell employees were performing maintenance on 34,500-volt switches while one of the switches had not been de-energized and properly barricaded and tagged to prevent exposure to live electrical parts before they began their work.

“Electricity can injure and kill almost instantly which makes it vital that power sources be de-energized and locked out, and workers be properly trained and equipped before electrical work is performed,” said Arthur Dube, OSHA’s area director in Buffalo. This statement given by Dube clarifies that de-energization, training and PPE have corresponding electrical standards that any company should comply with. O’Connell was not able to meet these standards which led to the $88,200 fine.

Yearly, OSHA never misses to issue citations on companies who violate safety standards. Injuries and unwanted losses usually are the reasons of these citations. It is the employer’s duty to ensure the welfare of your employees. Safety should always be the top priority. As a message to other employers, OSHA’s regional administrator, Robert Kulick said, “One means of preventing hazardous conditions and the accidents that can result from them is to establish an effective safety and health management system through which employers and employees work together to proactively evaluate, identify and eliminate hazards.”

O’Connell Electric has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, participate in an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. Let this be a reminder to all other companies to review your safety policies and make sure that they are compliant to state and federal regulations. Review the policies regularly and make sure they are implemented and practiced by all workers. These simple steps can help keep your workplace safe.

Story via: www.safetyservicescompany.com

India: Electrical Accident Deaths Continue to Rise

February 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Bangalore, India: Even as Mangalore Electricity Supply Company (Mescom) winds up its one-week awareness programme, it is confronted with an ever-increasing number of fatalities, due to electrocution. The latest being the death of a farmer who touched a faulty fuse on his pumpset near Vittal on Wednesday.

Between April and December, 52 persons, including one official, died in electrical accidents involving Mescom connections. By sheer extrapolation, the financial year 2013-14 will record the most accidents for the public utility company – which serves Dakshina Kannada, Udupi, Shimoga and Chikmagalur – in the recent years.

Reasons

Officials offer a bevy of reasons, the prime being sagging wires, bent poles – either due to trees or branches falling during the monsoons, or damage to poles during ploughing or construction work – improper grounding due to stagnating water, illegal construction close to electric lines and illegal irrigation pumpsets among others.

Employee deaths are attributed to “overconfidence” in not creating a ‘safe zone’ while repairing live wires, or “procedural lapses” arising due to pressures of attending numerous complaints during the monsoons.

“During the rains, the porcelain insulators may develop hairline cracks, and as water seeps in, the insulators conduct electricity. If the lineman, who has to climb up each pole and see the insulators, is not observant, he may end up touching a live insulator,” said an official. A rainy night may see a team of linemen attending four to five calls, adding to the possibility of procedural lapses, he said.

Though at least two linemen have died in service in the district, since April last year, they do not feature in official records of Mescom personnel dead in the district – the number remains zero. The reason being, said officials, that linemen on contract are not considered “employees of Mescom”.

“For the regular linemen they get facilities of rehabilitation from Mescom. For the contract workers, you have to haggle with the contractor for additional funds,” said Shivkumar, president of the Mescom non-permanent workers association.

Story Via: thehindu.com

Iowa: I-OSHA Cites Electrician Company After 5 Workers Hospitalized

February 4, 2014 Leave a comment

Sibley, Iowa — Iowa safety officials have cited a Sibley electrician business for violations that occurred when a flash explosion sent five people to a hospital in July, 2013.

The Iowa Division of Labor Services Occupational Safety and Health Bureau, or I-OSHA says the accident happened when workers were switching over electric lines at Timewell Drainage in Sibley.

Three entities have now been cited, including the City of Sibley Electric Department, Timewell, and now Current Electric of Sibley.

According to the citation, the issue occurred when workers were installing new electrical wiring to an 800 amp interior panel board. They say work was being performed while the wiring was energized and people were allowed in the immediate area without personal protective equipment.  After installation of wiring to the panel board, the employer was confirming that proper function of the equipment had been achieved.  They say lock and tagout was not applied ensuring that the equipment was not energized prior to installation of the panel cover.  They say people were in the immediate area and were exposed to an arc flash and/or arc blast, and life-threatening injuries were sustained.

I-OSHA says that Current Electric should have conducted frequent and regular inspections of job sites, materials, and equipment. They also allege that Current Electric did not instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the applicable regulations.

Last fall, Timewell Drainage was cited for not instructing their employees in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions, and for employees not wearing personal protective equipment.

Also last fall, the City of Sibley Electric Department was cited in connection with the incident.  I-OSHA says controls deactivated during the course of work on energized or de-energized equipment or circuits were not tagged on the worksite involving the energizing and deenergizing of a transformer with an incoming line voltage of thousands of volts.

When more than one independent crew requires the same line or equipment to be deenergized, the law requires a prominent tag for each such independent crew to be placed on the line or equipment by a designated employee in charge, and according to I-OSHA, that didn’t happen

Story Via: kiwaradio.com

Visit Martin Technical for Arc Flash Analysis and Lockout/ Tagout Services.

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

Nevada: MSHA Issues 135 Citations to Mining Company

February 4, 2014 Leave a comment

ELKO, NV — The Mine Safety and Health Administration said Veris Gold failed to protect employees from harm at the company’s Jerritt Canyon Mill, after issuing 61 citations and orders to the site.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s MSHA announced the results of the December inspections Wednesday. The inspectors issued 135 citations, 24 orders and one safeguard during special impact inspections conducted at 11 coal mines and two metal and nonmetal mines.

The two highlighted properties in the inspection report were Jerritt Canyon and Hanover Resources LLC’s Caymus Mine in Boone County, W. Va. Caymus Mine produces coal.

“These two examples clearly indicate that some mine operators still don’t get it,” said Joseph A. Main, assistant secretary of labor for mine safety and health. “They simply failed to comply with the Mine Act and find and fix hazards to protect miners from injury, illness and death.”

Veris Gold said “Jerritt Canyon takes all citations and actions from MSHA seriously and its management has been working with them diligently to review all claims. As of January 16, 2014, all citations and actions have been either acknowledged or met.

“It is important to note that the Jerritt Canyon Operations has an exemplary safety record with no fatalities since it began operating in 1982. Safety is our priority, and we will continue to work with MSHA in order to continue to ensure the safety of all employees.

“Recently, Veris Gold USA initiated a Safety Enhancement Program that is the personal responsibility of Graham Dickson, COO. This program will ensure that all employees remain secure at work and return home safely to their families at the end of the day.”

Jerritt Canyon received 49 citations and 12 orders after its inspection that began on Dec. 16. Veris Gold owns the Jerritt Canyon Mill Complex, which is 50 miles north of Elko and has more than 120 employees. The complex property includes three gold mines: Smith, SSX-Steer and Starvation Canyon.

According to the federal agency, “among the hazardous conditions cited during the inspection, MSHA found that an electrician working in the crusher area had been cleaning and performing maintenance on a 480-volt fully-energized switch gear, and there were spent mercury containers found at the bottom of wet mill stairs rather than being stored in a manner that would protect miners from mercury exposure. Nearly four feet of dirt had accumulated on the left side of a conveyor belt, blocking access to the steps and catwalk used to reach the plant and potentially hindering escape during an emergency.

“Inspectors also found: a chemical container improperly labeled; no warning signs for hazardous chemical storage; several unsecured gas cylinders; no provision for safe access in several locations; missing electrical cover plates on energized outlets; an improperly grounded cable; unlabeled breakers that exposed miners to electrical hazards; a broken ladder and insufficient illumination; failure to conduct workplace exams and air receiver tanks equipped with the wrong size pressure relief valves, creating the potential hazard of an exploding vessel.”

On Dec. 19, while MSHA inspectors were still on site, an electrical explosion and subsequent fire injured two employees in the mill.

The employees were injured after an arc flash and minor fire, said Shaun Heinrichs, chief financial officer for Veris Gold.

“One employee was airlifted with burns and another was taken into Elko with smoke inhalation,” Heinrichs told the Free Press in December. “Our thoughts are with our employees and their families. Safety is our utmost priority.”

Tim Woolever, Nevada Division of Forestry chief for the northern region, responded to the scene to handle the fire. He believed at least one of the men injured was an electrician who was working on a 480-volt panel.

MSHA inspected the Caymus Mine on Dec. 11 and issued 13 violations. The inspection party monitored the mine’s communication system to prevent advance notice of their arrival, and they proceeded to inspect the mine’s two working sections and a large portion of the conveyor belt. MSHA issued seven unwarrantable failure orders and six citations. This was the first impact inspection at this mine.

Since April 2010, MSHA has conducted 700 impact inspections and issued 11,562 citations, 1,076 orders and 49 safeguards.

Story Via ElkoDaily.com

Visit Martin Technical for Arc Flash Analysis.

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

CA: Arc Flash at Vandenberg Air Force Base

March 12, 2013 Leave a comment

Lompoc, CA: Two United Launch Alliance personnel working at Vandenberg Air Force Base were rushed to Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Saturday morning with serious injuries caused by an arc flash. One was flown by helicopter, and the other was taken by ambulance. The incident occurred at Space Launch Complex-6 on the south end of the base.

The base hasn’t released any more information on the incident, and its Public Affairs and Base Operator phone lines weren’t accepting calls or messages Saturday afternoon.

An arc flash occurs when an electric current leaves its intended path and travels through the air from one conductor to another or to ground. According to the National Safety Council, the most common cause of arc flash accidents is human error, including distraction, dropping a tool or using an uninsulated tool, and the accumulation of dust in a work area. The most common injuries from arc flash incidents are second- and third-degree burns.

Visit Martin Technical for Arc Flash Analysis and Training:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

India: 1 Electrocuted, 1 Seriously Burned

India: Deedar Singh (57), a resident of Jastna Khurd village near Lalru and a POWERCOM employee, lost his life by getting an electric shock while working on an electricity pole near Chaudheri village in Lalru on Saturday. Jasbir Singh, another lineman accompanying him, sustained serious injuries during the incident.

According to POWERCOM’s SDO Kehar Singh, the two linemen were sent to conduct the repair work at Chaudheri village on Saturday.

The electricity supply to the line had been discontinued for repair and their fuse uninstalled, but due to heavy storms and rain during the day, the fuse got connected and current passed through the line due to which Deedar Singh sustained the shock, said the SDO.

Jasbir Singh was referred to GMCH-32 where his condition is said to be stable and the body of the deceased has been sent to Civil Hospital, Dera Bassi for conducting the postmortem while further proceedings have been initiated, said the police.

Story via indianexpress.com

PA: Arc Flash Victim Recovering

February 18, 2013 Leave a comment

Bensalem, PA:  A man critically burned last month in an electrical explosion at a Bensalem carpet business is recovering at Temple University’s Burn Center.

Bensalem Battalion Chief Rob Sponheimer is not releasing the man’s name, but said he was burned over 60 percent of his body in the Jan. 17 fire at Adams Carpet, off Street Road near Hulmeville Road.

An employee of the carpet business was also burned, but not as severely, as he helped to put the flames out on the contractor with a fire extinguisher.

Sponheimer said the contractor was working inside a three-phase electrical panel when one of his tools came in contact with the back of the panel, causing an arc-flash.

The arc-flash ignited the contractor’s clothing and hair.

“These types of arc-flashes can reach temperatures above 5,000 degrees, have a great amount of energy associated with them and have a blinding flash and deafening noise,” Sponheimer said.

An arc-flash occurs when electrical insulation or isolation between conductors is broken or can no longer withstand the applied voltage, according to The National Fire Protection Association.

Sponheimer did not say if the carpet store employee was still hospitalized.

Story via phillyburbs.com

Visit Martin Technical for Arc Flash Hazard Analysis:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

NM: Tree Trimmer Avoids Electrocution

January 9, 2013 Leave a comment

LAS CRUCES, NM:

The tree trimmer involved in two serious accidents on the job in six months told KFOX14 he doesn’t plan to quit his job any time soon and plans to return to work as soon as Thursday.

“I feel lucky because I should be dead or something like that a couple times over,” Craig Benavidez said. “It’s a good thing to be alive.”

Benavidez, 52, was shocked by a power line Monday while he was trimming branches for an O’Donnell Drive home.

Benavidez was lowered to safety by a rescue team with the Las Cruces Fire Department after dangling from a tree about 30 feet above ground.  Benavidez was flown to University Medical Center in El Paso in critical condition, but Wednesday he told KFOX14 his injuries are minimal.  “I have scratches on my head and some electrical blowouts from my feet,” Benavidez said.   Benavidez said he has no memory of the incident or how it happened.  “Waking up in the hospital, that’s all I remember,” Benavidez said.  Monday’s incident was the second major accident on the job Craig has been involved with in the past six months.

In July, Benavidez was attacked by a swarm of Africanized bees.  During his 32-year career as a tree trimmer, Benavidez said he’s had some other minor accidents but nothing like he’s endured recently.   “I just have to look a little bit closer and be a little more careful. A lot more careful,” Benavidez said.  When asked why he planned to get back to work as a tree trimmer, Benavidez told KFOX14 he couldn’t imagine earning his living any other way.

Story via kfoxtv.com

Electrical Safety on Construction Sites

January 2, 2013 Leave a comment

Construction business owners know that having healthy and hard-working employees is the key to running a successful operation. No matter what the construction project at hand, there are often many types of electrical equipment being used on a daily basis, which means worker safety is more important than ever. Your construction team is invaluable to your company, and enacting proper training and safety protocols are the keys to preventing injury and maintaining highly productive workers.

Electrical Hazards on Construction Sites

The statistics are shocking

Many fatal accidents occur from careless mistakes but are very easily preventable. Common injuries occurring from electrical related accidents include blisters, burns, heart failure, nerve or tissue damage, and internal organ damage.

According to the National Institution of Health, several thousand people are injured and up to 1,000 people die from electric shocks while on the job. The U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) reports that electrocution is the second leading cause of worker fatalities on construction sites. Also, OSHA standards regarding electrical wiring and systems are ranked in the top 10 most frequent citations.

OSHA Construction eTool: Electrical Incidents

Common reasons for electric-related injuries

  • Improper installation of extension and flexible cords
  • Lacking ground-fault protection
  • Making contact with power lines
  • Outdated or misuse of equipment

Prevention is key

Preventing your employees from getting injured is a task that every business owner should prioritize, especially in a construction environment where safety accidents can lead to severe injuries or worse. Many companies run training programs on how to test circuits, make sure that wires are not exposed, proper methods of carrying power tools, and avoiding using aluminum ladders or tools around high-voltage areas. Following guidelines can significantly reduce the number of accidents on the job and maintain a safe work environment.

Endangering the health and safety of your workers is a risk you should never take. In the end, your employees will thank you for ensuring that their safety and well-being is a priority for your construction business.

Story via forconstructionpros.com

Visit Martin Technical for Electrical Safety Training:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

CANADA: Arc Flash Victims get Air Lifted

December 21, 2012 Leave a comment

REGINA, CANADA — The STARS air ambulance is to received $10 million over the next five years from the province’s Crown corporations.

The Crown Investments Corporation, SaskPower, SaskEnergy, SaskTel and SGI will each contribute $2 million toward this initiative within the five-year time frame.

“STARS is a natural fit for the Crowns to support,” Donna Harpauer, minister of Crown investments. said in a news release. “The government as a whole has committed to support STARS and the Crowns have crews working in rural and remote areas across the province, sometimes in hazardous conditions. We all have a stake in public safety and emergency response.”

STARS began providing service out of Regina on April 30 and the Saskatoon service followed on Oct. 15.

On Dec. 12, the air ambulance services was called after two SaskPower employees were injured.

“There was a workplace incident, there were no fatalities,” said Heather Johnson, SaskPower spokeswoman. “Two employees did suffer injuries as a result of an electrical arc flash. They are recovering from those injuries.”

However due to the weather STARS was unable to transport the two victims for treatment.

Johnson said she was unable to provide any more additional information about the injuries sustained by the two workers because “that’s personal health information.”

She said SaskPower is currently investigating the incident.

“We are in co-operation with Labour Relations and Workplace Safety,” said Johnson.

Alter is located 120 kilometres east of Estevan and three kms from the Manitoba border.

To date, STARS has flown more than 140 missions in Saskatchewan.

“We’re extremely grateful for this support,” said Rod Gantefoer STARS foundation executive director in a news release. “We’re still a young organization in this province and this will allow us to be there when we’re needed as we continue to build our fundraising capacity.”

Story via leaderpost.com

Visit Martin Technical for Arc Flash Hazard Analysis

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

: