Archive

Posts Tagged ‘lockout tagout’

MN: Verso Fined $39K for Lockout Tagout Violations

January 3, 2013 Leave a comment

SARTELL, MN: The Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Administration has closed its investigation into the explosion and fire at the Verso Paper Mill.

OSHA cited Verso for two serious citations.  They were fined a total of $39,200, which the company did not contest and paid.

James Honerman is the Communications Director for the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry.  He says the first violation was for failing to ensure specific “lockout/tagout procedures”.

An overheated compressor led to the explosion and fire.

Plant employees, doing routine maintenance, shut down a well that provided water to cool the plant’s compressors on the day of the accident.

The explosion and fire on Memorial Day killed Jon Maus, and injured four other workers.

The company announced in August it would not reopen the mill.

Story via wjon.com

Visit Martin Technical for Lockout / Tagout Services:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

Advertisements

OH: Lockout/Tagout Fines for TFO Tech Co. LTD; $51,000

November 8, 2012 Leave a comment

JEFFERSONVILLE, Ohio — The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safetyand Health Administration has cited TFO Tech Co. Ltd with 13 safety violations at the company’s auto parts manufacturing facility in Jeffersonville. The violations include a lack of machine guarding and allowing workers to perform maintenance on machinery without first isolating the equipment’s energy source. OSHA opened an inspection in July under the agency’s National Emphasis Program on Amputations after receiving a complaint alleging hazards. Proposed fines total $51,000.

‘TFO Tech has a responsibility to ensure that employees are properly protected from known workplace hazards – such as machinery becoming unintentionally energized during maintenance – that can result in amputations and other serious injuries,’ said Bill Wilkerson, OSHA’s area director in Cincinnati. ‘OSHA is committed to protecting workers, especially when employers fail to do so.’

Twelve serious violations involve a lack of guarding for the points of operation on automated mechanical forging presses, not having machine-specific lockout/tagout procedures, a damaged metal guard on a conveyor, inadequate strain relief and insulation for electrical cords, a lack of periodic inspections, unguarded floor openings, failing to train workers, and failing to lock out the energy sources of machinery during servicing and maintenance. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

One other-than-serious violation is failing to evaluate forklift operator performance at least once every three years. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

This is OSHA’s sixth inspection of the company; the last inspection was conducted in June 2003 and resulted in a citation for a serious violation involving a lack of machine guarding.

TFO Tech is based in Toyko, Japan, and employs about 140 workers at its Ohio facility. The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

To ask questions, obtain compliance assistance, file a complaint, or report workplace hospitalizations, fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, the public should call OSHA’s toll-free hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742) or the agency’s Cincinnati Area Office at 513-841-4132.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

Stroy via environmental-expert.com.

Visit Martin Technical for  Electrical Safety Services:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

GA: $69,300 Fine for Marglen Industries Inc

October 30, 2012 Leave a comment

Rome, GA:  OSHA fined Marglen Industries Inc. $69,300 for safety violations after a worker had four fingers amputated while servicing a dust collector’s airlock system at the company’s Rome, Ga., facility.

One violation involves allowing employees to perform service and maintenance on the dust collector’s airlock system without developing, documenting and using a specific lockout/tagout procedure for de-energizing the system, OSHA said.

OSHA also charged Marglen with one serious violation for allegedly failing to train workers as required by the company’s lockout/tagout program to ensure that they are able to recognize hazardous energy sources, the type and magnitude of the energy available in the workplace, and the methods necessary for isolating energy.

Marglen is a PET fiber recycling company.

Story via bizjournals.com

Visit Martin Technical for Lock Out Tag Out Services:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

NJ: $124K in OSHA Electrical Safety Fines

July 10, 2012 1 comment

Norwood, NJ:  The employees of a cleaning-products company face “serious” hazards, OSHA says.

Earth Friendly Products, which makes plant-based cleaning products, faces a $124,000 fine for 23 alleged safety and health violations at its Norwood facility, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration said on Thursday.

In response to a complaint, OSHA inspected the operation from Dec. 28 to May 31 and found workers were exposed to hazards like insufficient machine guarding, flammable liquids and deficient personal protective equipment(PPE), among other violations, the federal agency said.

“The large number and extensive range of safety and health hazards found at this establishment are of great concern to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration,” Lisa Levy, OSHA’s area director in Hasbrouck Heights, said in a statement. “This employer needs to address the hazards to prevent injuries from occurring at its facility.”

The company, based in Addison, Ill., makes “environmentally friendly” cleaning products. It employs 38 people at 380 Chestnut St. in Norwood.

The alleged “serious” violations at the Norwood plant include safety hazards related to confined-space entry, which means having workers in an enclosed area not meant for human occupancy, with limited access and only one way in or out, according to OSHA.

Other alleged violations include: deficient “lockout/tagout” procedures to prevent machinery from accidentally starting up; failing to train powered industrial truck operators and make sure that truck modifications are performed with the manufacturer’s prior written approval, and insufficient machine-guarding equipment.

Also on the list of alleged violations are: junction boxes connected with flexible cords instead of being mounted on the wall; unlabeled breakers on the electrcial panel; unsafe flammable liquid storage and handling; personal protective equipment and respirator deficiencies; a lack of eye-wash stations, and a deficiency in fire extinguisher training and hazard communications.

Earth Friendly Products has 15 business days from receiving the citations and penalties to either comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the citations and proposed penalties before OSHA’s independent review commission.

The company’s chief executive and owner, Van Vlahakis, said his lawyer, Amber Enriquez, will be meeting with OSHA officials next week. Enriquez said she couldn’t discuss the case in any detail, but added, “We are working with them to reduce the fine.”

Vlahakis said the company was once cited by OSHA at another one of its facilities for a minor infraction.

OSHA considers a violation “serious” when “there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known,” according to the agency.

Story via North Jersey.com

For Electrical Safety Training and Lockout/Tagout Service visit:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

MSHA Fatal Arc Flash Report Finds Negligence

January 21, 2011 Leave a comment

The following is an accident report by the US Depart of Labor on the death of  Michael Solomon.

UNITED STATES

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Metal and Nonmetal Mine Safety and Health

REPORT OF INVESTIGATION

Surface Nonmetal Mine

(Granite)

Fatal Electrical Accident

October 10, 2010

Hertzler Electrical Services LLC

Contractor ID No. R495

at

Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.

Snyder Mine

Snyder, Kiowa County, Oklahoma

Mine ID No. 34-01651

Investigators

Gary L. Cook

Mine Safety and Health Specialist

Dennis E. Robinson

Mine Safety and Health Inspector

Maxwell A. Clark

Electrical Engineer

Originating Office

Mine Safety and Health Administration

South Central District

1100 Commerce Street, Room 462

Dallas, TX 75242-0499

Edward E. Lopez, District Manager


 On October 10, 2010, Michael A. Solomon, contract apprentice electrician, age 42, and two co-workers were seriously injured when an arc flash occurred. They were performing maintenance work on an electrical circuit breaker. The circuit breaker was in the “OFF” position but remained energized on the input side. They were all hospitalized. Solomon died on October 12, 2010, as a result of his injuries.

OVERVIEW

 

The accident occurred because contractor management procedures failed to ensure that the electrical circuit breaker was de-energized prior to performing work on it.

Snyder Mine (Snyder), a surface granite mine, owned and operated by Martin Marietta Materials (Martin), is located near Snyder, Kiowa County, Oklahoma. The principal operating official is Joseph Schulte, plant manager. The mine operates one 8-hour shift per day, five days per week. Total employment is 23 persons.

GENERAL INFORMATION

 

Hertzler Electrical Services (Hertzler), an electrical contracting company, is located in Duncan, Stephens County, Oklahoma. Hertzler performs electrical work at Snyder on an as-needed basis. The principal operating official is Kelly Hertzler, owner. Hertzler employed 26 persons. Michael A. Solomon (victim) and 3 other Hertzler employees were working at Snyder at the time of the accident.

Granite is drilled and blasted from multiple benches in the quarry. Front-end loaders load broken rock into haul trucks. The material is then transported to the plant where it is crushed and stockpiled. Material is sold for use in asphalt and as railroad ballast.

The last regular inspection at this operation was completed on July 28, 2010.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ACCIDENT

On the day of the accident, Michael Solomon, apprentice electrician, reported for work at 5:30 a.m. at Hertzler’s office in Duncan, Oklahoma. He and Robert Law, journeyman electrician and supervisor, drove to Snyder while Christopher Bethany, apprentice electrician, and Christopher Fowler, apprentice electrician, drove to Snyder in another vehicle. About 7:00 a.m., the four electricians arrived at Snyder to complete a job they had started on October 8, 2010. They were replacing a junction box and installing new cables for six electric motors.

After completing the planned electrical work, Law asked Kenneth Piper, plant operator, to start the plant so they could check the new installations. Piper energized the plant for 20 minutes then de-energized it after verifying that all new installations were functional.

Hertzler employees frequently worked at Martin plants and they had been asked to install ground fault indicator lights at all plants when it was convenient to do so. With that request in mind, Law decided to install ground fault indicator lights at the main circuit breaker for the primary plant.

At 12:45 p.m., Bethany, Law, and Solomon entered the MCC trailer to install the indicator lights. Fowler remained outside to put away materials and equipment that were not needed. Piper had gone to the plant break room. The main circuit breaker was turned to the “OFF” position prior to working on the indicator lights. However, the fuses at the nearby transformer station were not removed to de-energize the circuit breaker. The input side of the main circuit breaker remained energized.

At 12:55 p.m., Solomon was kneeling in front of the main circuit breaker while Bethany and Law were standing next to him. The indicator lights had been mounted on the inside door of the cabinet which enclosed the main circuit breaker. One end of the ground wire for the indicator lights had been connected and the bottom section of the cover for the main circuit breaker had been removed when the accident occurred.

A fault condition was created while the electricians were working on the energized side of the main circuit breaker and an arc flash occurred. The 480-volt lead wires dropped from the bottom side of the main circuit breaker and one of the phases contacted the cabinet which enclosed the circuit breaker.

The three employees inside the MCC trailer were injured but managed to exit to the outside. Fowler heard the arc flash and ran to the MCC trailer to offer assistance. Piper heard the arc flash and came to the scene before calling for emergency medical services (EMS).

EMS arrived at 1:14 p.m., treated all the injured persons, and transported them to a hospital, where Solomon died on October 12, 2010, as a result of his injuries.

INVESTIGATION OF THE ACCIDENT

On the day of the accident, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) was notified at 1:44 p.m. by a telephone call from Joseph Schulte, plant manager, to MSHA’s emergency hotline. Lawrence Dunlap, supervisory mine safety and health inspector, was notified and an investigation was started the same day. An order was issued pursuant to section 103(j) of the Mine Act to ensure the safety of miners. This order was later modified to section 103(k) of the Mine Act. A citation was issued for untimely reporting of the accident.

MSHA’s investigators traveled to the mine, made a physical inspection of the accident scene, interviewed employees, and reviewed documents and work procedures relevant to the accident. MSHA conducted the investigation with the assistance of mine management, contractor management, the Oklahoma Construction Industries Board and the Oklahoma Department of Mines.

DISCUSSION

Location of the Accident

The accident occurred in the MCC trailer, which was located at ground level about 30 feet from the primary plant. The MCC trailer was a metal shipping container with a wooden floor.

Weather conditions at the mine were clear skies with an air temperature of 82 degrees Fahrenheit. The weather conditions were not considered to be a factor in the accident.

Electrical Equipment

A local power company provided 12,470-volt service to the primary plant at three 500-kva transformers. The transformers were mounted on elevated bracing between two power poles located about 15 feet from the MCC trailer. The transformers were protected by 65-amp fuses located at the top of one of the poles.

The secondary side of the transformers supplied 480-volt power to the main circuit breaker, located in the MCC trailer for the primary plant. Two parallel conductors per phase were routed from the output side of the transformers through a weatherhead in the top of the MCC trailer to the bottom side of the main circuit breaker.

The main circuit breaker for the primary plant was a “bottom feed” breaker located in a Type 4 cabinet in the MCC trailer. The main breaker specifications were unverifiable since the breaker was severely damaged as a result of the accident. The power conductors from the transformers entered the main circuit breaker from the bottom side rather than the top side as is typical with most electrical circuit breakers. This arrangement made it necessary to route the incoming power cables from the top of the MCC trailer down to the inside floor then bend them back up 180 degrees into the lugs of the main circuit breaker.

Training and Experience

Michael A. Solomon (victim) had 5 years, 10 months of experience, including 4 months at this mine. He had received all training required by 30 CFR Part 46.

Christopher C. Bethany had 2 years, 5 months of experience, including 4 months at this mine. He had received all training required by 30 CFR Part 46.

Christopher L. Fowler had 12 days of experience, including 2 days experience at this mine. He had not received all the training required by 30 CFR Part 46. A non-contributory citation was issued.

Robert E. Law had 13 years, 6 months of experience, including 6 months at this mine. He had received all training required by 30 CFR Part 46.

ROOT CAUSE ANALYSIS

A root cause analysis was conducted and the following root cause was identified:

Root Cause: Contractor management procedures failed to ensure that the electrical circuit breaker was de-energized prior to performing work on it.

Corrective Action: Mine management conducted training classes for all employees at the mine regarding lock-out and tag-out policies and procedures. All electrical contractors will be trained in the future regarding proper lock-out and tag-out and “bottom feed” circuit breakers. The main electrical circuit breaker was replaced with a “top feed” circuit breaker. Management verified that Snyder did not have any additional “bottom feed” circuit breakers at Snyder.

CONCLUSION

The accident occurred because contractor management procedures failed to ensure that the electrical circuit breaker was de-energized prior to performing work on it.

ENFORCEMENT ACTIONS

Issued to Martin Marietta Materials

ORDER No. 6576706 was issued October 10, 2010, under the provisions of Section 103(j) of the Mine Act:

    An accident occurred at this location on October 10, 2010, at 12:55 p.m. This order is being issued to prevent the destruction of any evidence which would assist in the investigation of the cause or causes of the accident. It prohibits all activity at the MCC for the crusher plant and the pole-mounted transformer providing power to the MCC, except to the extent necessary to prevent or eliminate an imminent danger, until MSHA has determined that it is safe to resume normal mining operations in this area. This order was issued verbally to the mine operator at 2:06 p.m. on October 10, 2010, and is now been reduced to writing.

This order was modified to a 103(k) order when investigators arrived at the mine. It was terminated on October 25, 2010, after conditions that contributed to the accident no longer existed.

CITATION No. 6576715 was issued October 21, 2010, under the provisions of Section 104(a) of the Mine Act for a violation of 30 CFR 56.12017:

    An accident occurred at this operation on October 10, 2010, when three contractor employees worked on an energized 480-volt electrical circuit. All three employees were hospitalized and one died on October 12, 2010.

This citation was terminated on October 25, 2010, after all persons at this mine were retrained on lock-out and tag-out and de-energizing electrical circuits prior to performing work on them.

Issued to Hertzler Electrical Services

CITATION No. 6576716 was issued October 21, 2010, under the provisions of Section 104(d)(1) of the Mine Act for a violation of 30 CFR 56.12017:

    An accident occurred at this operation on October 10, 2010, when three contractor employees worked on an energized 480-volt electrical circuit. All three employees were hospitalized and one died on October 12, 2010. Contractor management engaged in aggravated conduct constituting more than ordinary negligence in that one of the employees was a supervisor and he did not ensure that the electrical circuit was de-energized before working on it. This violation is an unwarrantable failure to comply with a mandatory standard.

This citation was terminated on October 25, 2010, after all persons at this contractor were retrained on lock-out and tag-out and de-energizing electrical circuits prior to performing work on them.

CA Business Owner Faces Manslaugher Charges for Failure to Follow Electrical Safety Standards

October 20, 2010 Leave a comment

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA –  The owner and the manager of a San Francisco printing company where a pregnant employee was killed in a machine accident in 2008 appeared in court this morning on manslaughter charges.

Digital Pre-Press International owner and CEO Sanjay Sakhuja and pressroom manager Alick Yeung are each charged with involuntary manslaughter and violation of a California Occupational Safety and Health Administration code in connection with the Jan. 29, 2008, death of Margarita Mojica. The company is also charged in the case.

Mojica, 26, of Oakland, was crushed to death by a creasing and cutting machine she was preparing for a job.

Prosecutors allege that workers at the company had not been trained to safely operate the machine, and that the machine lacked required safety devices.

District Attorney Kamala Harris released a statement Monday calling the deaths of Mojica and her unborn child “tragedies that never should have occurred.”

In court today, the two men agreed to postpone their arraignment on the charges until Oct. 29 in order for Yeung to secure an attorney from the public defender’s office.

Sakhuja, 52, of Alameda, and Yeung, 50, of San Francisco, surrendered Tuesday and were still in custody this morning, but have posted $300,000 and $100,000 bail, respectively.

They will be released from jail later today, according to Sakhuja’s attorney, Tony Brass.

Outside court, Brass claimed that a criminal prosecution is unnecessary because Mojica’s family has already been compensated.

“Obviously this is a tragedy of the greatest proportion,” Brass said, “but this case has nothing to do with compensating the victim’s family for that tragedy.”

Brass called it “a horrible accident” and said Mojica’s family has already received a multi-million-dollar settlement from the company’s insurers.

“This is about punishing a small businessman,” he said.

Sakhuja’s “mom-and-pop shop” in Potrero Hill employs about 60 people, Brass said.

Regarding the safety allegations, Brass responded, “What the industry standards were remains a question.” He said the last Cal/OSHA inspection of the shop prior to the accident was carried out before the machine that killed Mojica was installed.

The company’s insurers inspected the machine after it was installed and “didn’t find any problems,” Brass said.

Mojica was crushed when the machine, which functioned like “a giant, mechanized clamshell,” according to prosecutors, suddenly turned on as she was reaching into it.

Cal/OSHA performed two safety inspections of Digital Pre-Press International in 1999 and 2001 after receiving complaints, Cal/OSHA spokeswoman Krisann Chasarik said.

The inspections resulted in the company being cited for various safety violations, including improper face and eye protection for workers, not following electrical safety requirements, lockout tagout, a lack of sufficient safety guardrails, and not having an written electrical safety program on prevention of workplace injuries, she said.

Following Mojica’s death, Cal/OSHA issued 14 citations against the company for safety-related violations related to the machine and training at the company, according to Chasarik.

“They were required to abate the hazards, and they did that,” Chasarik said. Monetary penalties from the citations are on hold pending the resolution of criminal proceedings, she said.

In the criminal case, Sakhuja and Yeung could be fined up to $250,000 each and the company up to $1.5 million

Story via ABClocal.go.com