Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Ohio’

Ohio: $86K in Fines for Ohio Plant for Safety Violations

February 17, 2014 Leave a comment

Ohio: The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited G&J Pepsi-Cola Bottlers Inc. for seven workplace health and safety violations, carrying proposed penalties of $86,900. OSHA initiated an inspection of the Franklin Furnace plant in July 2013 under its Site-Specific Targeting Program, which targets facilities with higher than average illness and injury rates.

“This company consistently failed to protect its workers and implement basic safety requirements,” said Bill Wilkerson, OSHA’s area director in Cincinnati. “Repeat violations demonstrate a lack of commitment to employee safety and health, and that is unacceptable when employee safety is on the line.”

Two repeat safety violations involve failing to ensure that employees utilize appropriate personal protective  equipment when working with electrical sources and implement lockout/tagout procedures to prevent the unintentional startup of equipment during maintenance and servicing, when employees are most at risk.

A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. The same violations were cited in 2009 at the company’s Hamilton facility.

Five serious safety citations were issued to the company. Two of those violations involved failure to use lockout/tagout procedures. The remaining three included failing to perform hazard assessments related to personal protective equipment, failure to use appropriate protective equipment and failure to perform annual fit testing to ensure employees wore respirators. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

G&J employs more than 1,600 people at 11 locations in Ohio and Kentucky, including production facilities in Lexington and Winchester, Ky., and in Columbus and Portsmouth, Ohio. G&J has distribution centers in Hamilton, Ripley, Hillsboro, Athens, Chillicothe, and Zanesville and in Harrodsburg, Ky. The company has contested the findings before the independent Occupational Safety & Health Review Commission.

Story Via: norwalkreflector.com

Visit Martin Technical for Lockout/Tagout Procedures

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

Advertisements

OH: LOTO Fines of $293K for Reliable Castings Corp.

January 14, 2014 Leave a comment

Sidney, OH:  The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced today that it’s cited Reliable Castings Corp. for 14 safety and health violations, carrying proposed penalties of $293,700.

The federal agency said an inspection found workers were exposed to hazards at the Sidney aluminum die castings manufacturing facility.

“OSHA’s inspectors found a facility with multiple hazards and where safety was continually compromised,” said Kim Nelson, OSHA’s area director in Toledo. “Reliable Castings Corporation has a responsibility to train its workers and to implement all required safety procedures.”

One repeat violation was issued for failing to “de-energize an industrial robot and implement lockout/tag out procedures prior to performing servicing and maintenance work on the equipment.”

OSHA said four willful violations involved failing to develop lockout procedures for servicing and changing molds on various production cells, prevent exposure to molten aluminum splash hazards from the melting furnace, inspect chains on a daily basis and prevent use of an unapproved work platform to lift workers with the fork truck. “A willful violation is committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law’s requirement, or plain indifference to employee safety and health,” OSHA said.

Eight serious violations involved failing to install guardrails near ovens and floor openings to prevent fall hazards, perform protective equipment assessments, require the use of face shields and hard hats, ensure adequate guarding on 21 machines in the foundry areas, provide lockout procedures, ensure use of an electrical cabinet is protected from water, label lifting devices with load capacities and provide safety data sheets to workers, OSHA said.

Reliable Castings Corp. is based in Sidney and employs about 140 workers there and about 130 workers at its Cincinnati location.

OSHA said the company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the citations and penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

A spokesman for Reliable Castings could not be reached Thursday.

Story Via: limaohio.com

Visit Martin Technical for Lockout/ Tagout Services.

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

OH: OSHA Fines Mahle Engine Components USA Inc $369,000

McConnelsville, Ohio:  The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Mahle Engine Components USA Inc. with 26 health and safety violations, including eight repeat, for exposing workers to electrical, lead, and machine guarding hazards at its automotive parts manufacturing facility in McConnelsville, Ohio. The proposed fines total $369,000.

Two repeat health violations were cited for lead exposure, including failing to record employees’ blood lead levels to monitor exposure to lead, and test the cleanroom for lead contamination. Lead can cause damage to the nervous system and other organs if inhaled or ingested in dangerous quantities. Six repeat safety violations were cited for failing to mount and identify fire extinguishers, provide machine guarding, ensure safe work practices when exposed to electrical hazards, ground pins from electrical equipment, and train workers on recognizing electrical hazards.

“Employers cited for multiple safety and health violations have a responsibility to review their safety and health procedures, evaluate the hazards that exist and train workers to ensure a safe and healthful working environment,” says Nick Walters, OSHA’s regional director in Chicago. “When an employer, such as Mahle, is cited for repeat violations, it shows a lack of commitment to protecting the safety and health of workers. OSHA will not tolerate such negligence.”

A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. Mahle Engine Components USA was previously cited for these violations during inspections in 2009 and 2011 at the McConnelsville location as well as at facilities in Manchester, Mo., and Trumbull, Conn.

A total of 18 serious violations were cited for lack of machine guarding; improper storage of acetylene and oxygen cylinders; electrical hazards; lack of load ratings on hook lifting devices; allowing operators to carry loads traveling over people creating a struck-by hazard; improper storage of respirators; failing to provide appropriate personal protective equipment and require its use; and keep the tables in the lunch room clean and free of lead accumulation. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Because of the hazards and the violations cited, Mahle Engine Components has been placed in OSHA’s Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law. OSHA’s SVEP focuses on recalcitrant employers that endanger workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations. Under the program, OSHA may inspect any of the employer’s facilities if it has reasonable grounds to believe there are similar violations.

The company, headquartered in Morristown, Tenn., has operated the McConnelsville facility since 2008 and is a subsidiary of the Mahle Group, which employees about 50,000 workers and operates about 100 production plants worldwide. Inspected in 2009 and 2010, the McConnelsville facility has been cited with a total of 17 violations.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Story via cemag.us

Visit Martin Technical for Electrical Safety Training:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

OH: Lockout/Tagout Fines for TFO Tech Co. LTD; $51,000

November 8, 2012 Leave a comment

JEFFERSONVILLE, Ohio — The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safetyand Health Administration has cited TFO Tech Co. Ltd with 13 safety violations at the company’s auto parts manufacturing facility in Jeffersonville. The violations include a lack of machine guarding and allowing workers to perform maintenance on machinery without first isolating the equipment’s energy source. OSHA opened an inspection in July under the agency’s National Emphasis Program on Amputations after receiving a complaint alleging hazards. Proposed fines total $51,000.

‘TFO Tech has a responsibility to ensure that employees are properly protected from known workplace hazards – such as machinery becoming unintentionally energized during maintenance – that can result in amputations and other serious injuries,’ said Bill Wilkerson, OSHA’s area director in Cincinnati. ‘OSHA is committed to protecting workers, especially when employers fail to do so.’

Twelve serious violations involve a lack of guarding for the points of operation on automated mechanical forging presses, not having machine-specific lockout/tagout procedures, a damaged metal guard on a conveyor, inadequate strain relief and insulation for electrical cords, a lack of periodic inspections, unguarded floor openings, failing to train workers, and failing to lock out the energy sources of machinery during servicing and maintenance. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

One other-than-serious violation is failing to evaluate forklift operator performance at least once every three years. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

This is OSHA’s sixth inspection of the company; the last inspection was conducted in June 2003 and resulted in a citation for a serious violation involving a lack of machine guarding.

TFO Tech is based in Toyko, Japan, and employs about 140 workers at its Ohio facility. The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA’s area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

To ask questions, obtain compliance assistance, file a complaint, or report workplace hospitalizations, fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, the public should call OSHA’s toll-free hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742) or the agency’s Cincinnati Area Office at 513-841-4132.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

Stroy via environmental-expert.com.

Visit Martin Technical for  Electrical Safety Services:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

OH: Arc Flash Shuts Key Tower Down

August 29, 2012 Leave a comment

CLEVELAND, Ohio:  An electrical explosion inside a basement vault Monday afternoon forced the evacuation of about 2,500 workers from Key Tower on Cleveland’s Public Square.  No one was injured, Cleveland Fire Department spokesman Larry Gray said, but a security guard said it took about 30 minutes to evacuate the building’s 58 floors, where the workers were greeted by heavy rain. Gray said the electrical fire was quickly extinguished by the sprinkler system in the basement. The explosion occurred around 2 p.m., but Gray said when firefighters arrived within five minutes, they found the system had been properly working and the fire had been contained.

“What the explosion did do was knock out power to the first four floors, and smoke infiltrated the first two floors,” Gray said. “As a precautionary measure, we had the total building evacuated.” Key Tower officials announced by 3 p.m. that the building was closed for the day. No one was let back in except employees who had left valuables at their work stations — and they were accompanied by security. The company was also providing updates on its Twitter accounts,  including information for employees who have questions.

Employees had mixed feelings about the evacuation – generally not happy going out in the rain, but thankful that there was no rendition of “Towering Inferno.” “I’m on the seventh floor, and I could smell something coming from the loading dock area (which is above the basement),” said Dennis Walsh, a Lakewood resident. “It was more like steam than smoke…nothing was bellowing out.” Donna Jacobs of Sagamore Hills, who works with Walsh in KeyBank’s securities lending department, said she didn’t mind the work interruption. “I’d rather be in the rain than in a building on fire,” she said.

Janet Averman of Eastlake, an employee of Squires Sanders LLP on the 49th floor, said the incident reminded her of a similar one in 2003, when the building lost power and she had to walk all the way down to the exit. “At least this time the elevator was still working,” she said. “God was on my side this time.” It was an easy day at work for Craig Uterhark of Gate Mills. “You can’t call today a mundane Monday,” he said. “I’m glad nobody got hurt. My shift starts at 2 p.m., and I walked in the building and walked right back out. For me, I got a nice day off, even if it is raining.”

Story via cleveland.com

For Arc Flash Analysis Services visit:

Martin Technical Electrical Safety Services Arc Flash

Advertisement – Click on Ad to visit Martin Technical

Man Shocked & Disabled: No Report to OSHA

January 10, 2011 Leave a comment

WESTERVILLE, Ohio — Twenty-three months after surviving an electrical shock at work, DJ Gordon is disabled. He suffers from a variety of illnesses including cataracts in his eyes, brain damage and the loss of fingers and bones in both hands.

“At that time I had fourth degree burns on my left index finger and even burned out part of the bone and that was the exit point. I ended up with third degree burns on my right index finger,” remembers Gordon.

In July 2009, Stacey Gordon, DJ’s wife, checked to see if the general contractor who hired him, reported the incident to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Shockingly, she found no report. NBC4 contacted OSHA for an explanation and this is was were told by spokesperson Scott Allen.

OSHA regulations state that an employer must report to OSHA within 8 hours any case involving a work-related fatality or the inpatient hospitalization of 3 or more employees as a result of a work-related incident,” explained Allen.

With the six-month reporting deadline passed, the Gordon’s were at a loss, unable to add DJ’s injury to the annual OSHA statistics. And while they don’t blame the contractor, they do believe something more could have been done.

“The man was electrocuted, taken by a squad as a trauma. The spirit of the law in my opinion says it should be reported,” said Stacey Gordon.  [Note from blogger:  The term electrocuted is misused here.  The proper term is “shocked”.  An electrocution results in death by electrical shock]

The Gordon family wants to the law changed to require companies to report all hospitalizations. They also feel the Bureau of Workers Compensation should have the authority to report work place accidents as well. Scott Allen says such a change would overload the system with endless paperwork. But all is not lost. Anyone can report a workplace injury without waiting for their employer to do so. The report can be made to OSHA anonymously too.

Story via nbc41.com

Cleveland State U Found Not Liable for Electrical Death

November 19, 2010 Leave a comment

CLEVELAND, Ohio — Cleveland State University is not liable for the death of biology professor Tarun Mal, who was electrocuted in 2005 when he used a nongrounded electrical device that adapts a three-pronged plug for a two-pronged device to plug in a homemade grow lamp, the Ohio Court of Claims ruled this week (pdf).

 The university, however, now requires all employees to undergo electrical safety training. It also has installed ground fault circuit interrupters, which detect fluctuations in current and breaks the circuit to prevent electrocution, in electrical outlets in laboratories.

“It was obviously a tragic incident,” said CSU spokesman Joe Mosbrook.

Mal, 42, was in a biology lab in the Science Research Building at CSU on Aug. 16, 2005 with two students when they decided to use a three-tiered metal rack with two fluorescent lights on the top tier to conduct an experiment, according to court documents. The three-pronged light plug was attached to an adapter called a “cheater plug,” which was then plugged into a two-prong electrical timer.

Mal held on to the metal rack and knelt down to plug the timer into a three-prong wall outlet when the grow lamp emitted a surge of electricity of nearly 400 volts. The associate professor was electrocuted.

It was later discovered that one of the fluorescent lights had a defective “ballast,” a small transformer used to regulate voltage.

Mal’s wife, Sanchita Mal-Sarkar, an instructor in computer and informational science at CSU, and their daughter sued the university. A trial was held in fall 2007.

Mal-Sarkar’s lawyers contended that CSU did not conduct routine inspections of electrical equipment and wiring in the laboratories and did not provide electrical safety training to employees. They also alleged the use of cheater plugs and the lack of ground fault circuit interrupters contributed to unsafe conditions in the laboratory because water is nearby.

According to testimony, the National Electric Code prohibits cheater plugs and requires circuit interrupters in bathrooms and kitchens, because water is nearby, but not in areas such as laboratories.

CSU lawyers said the university did not authorize the acquisition or use of the light rack assembly and did not require Mal to use that system to conduct his research.

In his decision, issued Wednesday, Judge Joseph Clark wrote that while he was convinced CSU may have violated certain Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Public Employees Risk Reduction Program regulations by not providing electrical safety training or inspecting its 200 laboratories, such violations did not rise to the level of an intent to injure an employee.

Even if CSU provided training and conducted inspections there was no way to determine if that would have prevented Mal’s death from the use of unauthorized equipment, he wrote.

CSU’s Employee Health and Safety Manual, adopted in January, 2006, has an extensive section on electrical safety. It prohibits cheater plugs and requires approval before any non-commercial electrical equipment is used in laboratories. And if water is used within six feet of an electrical outlet a circuit interrupter will be installed.

Story via blog.cleveland.com