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Posts Tagged ‘Robert Kulick’

New York: Arc Flash Injury Leads to $88K in Fines

July 24, 2014 Leave a comment

NY – Another thousand-dollar-fine was issued by OSHA for citing violations on electrical safety and hazardous energy control standards. This time to O’Connell Electric Co., particularly on the May 18 Worker Arc Flash Injury. The incident happened at the North Campus of the State University of New York (SUNY) when O’Connell employees were performing maintenance on 34,500-volt switches while one of the switches had not been de-energized and properly barricaded and tagged to prevent exposure to live electrical parts before they began their work.

“Electricity can injure and kill almost instantly which makes it vital that power sources be de-energized and locked out, and workers be properly trained and equipped before electrical work is performed,” said Arthur Dube, OSHA’s area director in Buffalo. This statement given by Dube clarifies that de-energization, training and PPE have corresponding electrical standards that any company should comply with. O’Connell was not able to meet these standards which led to the $88,200 fine.

Yearly, OSHA never misses to issue citations on companies who violate safety standards. Injuries and unwanted losses usually are the reasons of these citations. It is the employer’s duty to ensure the welfare of your employees. Safety should always be the top priority. As a message to other employers, OSHA’s regional administrator, Robert Kulick said, “One means of preventing hazardous conditions and the accidents that can result from them is to establish an effective safety and health management system through which employers and employees work together to proactively evaluate, identify and eliminate hazards.”

O’Connell Electric has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, participate in an informal conference with OSHA’s area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. Let this be a reminder to all other companies to review your safety policies and make sure that they are compliant to state and federal regulations. Review the policies regularly and make sure they are implemented and practiced by all workers. These simple steps can help keep your workplace safe.

Story via: www.safetyservicescompany.com

New York: $147K Settelment for Electrocution Death

January 24, 2014 1 comment

Brooklyn, NY: A  telecommunications company has reached a settlement with OSHA resolving  litigation surrounding the electrocution death of an employee in 2011 in  Brooklyn. Under the agreement, the company will pay a fine of $147,000 and make  changes to its electrical safety training.

OSHA  Regional Administrator Robert Kulick commented, “While no settlement can bring  this worker back to his family, co-workers, and friends, this agreement can help  prevent similar and needless tragedies in the future.”

The  fatality occurred when a field technician came into contact with an energized  power line as he worked from an aerial lift bucket. OSHA determined that field  technicians were not adequately trained, did not wear proper protective gloves,  and did not ground the suspension strand they were installing.

The  settlement was filed with the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission,  which reviews contested cases.

Story Via: safety.blr.com

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NY: OSHA Fines Rosina Food Products over $54K; Lockout / Tagout Violations

January 3, 2013 Leave a comment

BUFFALO, N.Y. — The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Rosina Food Products Inc. with nine serious violations of workplace safety standards at its West Seneca production facility. The manufacturer of frozen food products faces a proposed penalty of $54,750.

The inspection, which began in September, identified several deficiencies in the plant’s process safety management program, a detailed set of requirements and procedures employers must follow to proactively address hazards associated with processes and equipment involving large amounts of hazardous chemicals. In this case, the process is the operation and maintenance of the plant’s refrigeration system and the chemical is anhydrous ammonia, used in the refrigeration system.

‘The stringent and comprehensive requirements of OSHA’s process safety management standard are designed to prevent catastrophic incidents, such as the uncontrolled release of highly hazardous chemicals, including ammonia,’ said Arthur Dube, OSHA’s area director for western New York. ‘This requires full, effective and proactive adherence to the standard’s requirements by the employer.’

In this case, OSHA’s Buffalo Area Office found that the plant lacked effective standard operating procedures for all emergency shutdown procedures of the refrigeration system, necessary corrective actions identified during hazard analyses of the refrigeration process, clear instructions for safely conducting refrigeration procedures, written procedures to maintain the ongoing mechanical integrity of all equipment used in the refrigeration process, and procedures for handling small releases of anhydrous ammonia. In addition, the inspection found that all required safety testing was not performed. The plant did not develop specific procedures for locking out machines to prevent their unintended startup during servicing, did not inspect such procedures, and did not use group lockout/tagout procedures as required. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

‘One method of enhancing workers’ safety is developing and maintaining an effective illness and injury prevention program in which management and employees work together to identify and prevent hazardous conditions,’ said Robert Kulick, OSHA’s regional administrator in New York.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, meet with OSHA’s area director or contest the findings to the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Story via environmental-expert.com

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